Episode 26

Create your own Outcomes with Rebecca Allen

Published on: 16th March, 2022

Rebecca Allen grew up in Hong Kong and now lives in Sydney with her husband and two children, whom she water-birthed. Thirteen years ago, she gave up her full-time job in advertising to start her own coaching business helping women achieve career success. In this interview, as well as explaining why she chose to naturally birth her children, Rebecca gives some invaluable advice on:

  • creating your own outcomes and focusing on what you wish to achieve
  • seeking information and informing yourself to help reduce your fears 
  • developing the mindset that you are worthy and deserving of success
  • launching your own business and dealing with learning curves and plateaux
  • adapting your expectations, and releasing the need to control situations

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Music: Pablito's Way by Paolo Pavan

Transcript

Maribel 2:00

Welcome back to another episode of the Audaciousness podcast, and today, we have with us Rebecca. And I'm really very excited to have you with us, Rebecca. Would you like to start telling us what you do, who you are and a little bit of your audacious activities in your life?

Rebecca:

I’d love to! Thank you so much for having me on the show Maribel and also Helen. I would love to introduce myself. My name is Rebecca Allen, I'm in my mid-40s and I live in Sydney. I'm English, but I've travelled all over the place in my lifetime. I actually grew up in Hong Kong. So I was born in the UK but when I was very small we moved to Hong Kong and I lived there until I was 18. So I did all my schooling in Hong Kong. And then I moved back to the UK and I studied there, I did my university study there, and I worked also in London. And then I decided that I had to go travelling, it was one of those things I had to do. So I did this huge kind of travel for a year, and learned an awful lot about myself — I'm sure we’re going to come back to all that stuff in a bit — and I ended up settling in Sydney. So for the last 13 years I've been running my own business. I'm a Career Success Coach for corporate women working in finance, working in consulting industries and also in STEM. And I focus my energies now on personal branding, and really helping people bring out their authentic selves as they lead. And I think that a lot of the work that I do comes from the journey that I've been through, from a personal perspective, which kind of stems really from the amount of travel that I've done and working, I think, in different countries. And I've really seen how incredibly powerful multiculturalism is, in terms of rounding people, making people more self-aware, making people more accepting of others, more tolerant, and embracing one another, embracing each other's strengths and backgrounds. And I see that as something that has stemmed from all that travel that I've done. And it's something that I think has shaped the way I look at the world now and how I look at my business, my work, my life, how I play, the adventures that I go on. And I really think that that acceptance and that embracing of everyone, and everyone's values and backgrounds, is a really huge part of that.

Maribel:

Amazing. That sounds really incredible. Thanks a lot for sharing all that. So you've done lots of audacious things. And if I asked you, or challenged you, do you think that you could choose which is the one thing of all the audacious things that you've done, that you'd say, that was really the most audacious one, I had to overcome lots of inner criticism or fears or obstacles to get to that?

Rebecca:

It's a very, very interesting question. I'm not sure I can choose one, to be honest. There's been a lot of things have happened in my life, most of it that I have dictated. I’m a big believer in creating your own outcomes. So nothing really happens by chance with me. You create your own luck, you make your own path, you decide your own outcomes, you decide on the relationships you have, you decide on the relationships you end. And those are very much part of my philosophy, I think. And I think I’ve always had the view that you've got control, you've got control over what you choose, you've got control over what you choose to do and what you choose not to do. For example, one of the things that I've been told many times is that I'm lucky. And I think that's a really interesting concept because it comes across mostly when people find out that I live in Sydney, for example: “You’re so lucky to live in Sydney.” But the thing that’s interesting about living in Sydney is you have to do a lot of queuing up at immigration offices, you have to fill in a lot of forms, you have to have a lot of interviews to actually get that opportunity. It doesn’t just happen, it's not luck. You have to make that thing happen. So I'm not really a big believer in this concept of luck. I really think that you have to make your own outcomes happen. So if I was to pick one thing that really was an uphill challenge, I could go through moving jobs, which is pretty common for a lot of people. I've done a massive career transition, for example, from advertising into coaching and setting up my business, which is two things — becoming an entrepreneur was another huge learning curve and still is. Living in different countries, living in Asia, living in Australasia, travelling all over Africa. The one that kind of pops out is hypnobirthing as well. I decided I wanted to natural birth my two kids and I’d seen all these kinds of programs on TV around women having problems with feeling terrified with birth and I just thought, This can’t be normal. I remember when I was very small being at a friend's house and her dog was giving birth to puppies. And I remember sitting there really mesmerized — I was about eight or nine — as this dog just kept on popping puppy after puppy out, she had six or seven puppies. And she was just lying there, really relaxed. And then when I was a bit older, I also saw a cow give birth. I was working on a farm and I saw this cow give birth, and again, it was that same kind of very calm, relaxed thing. And I thought, Hang on, animals seem to be doing this in a really relaxed way, what's that all about? So I started reading about that. And I decided when I was going to have children, that's what I wanted to try and do. And I know not everyone can do very calm, natural birthing, and there are all sorts of complications that can happen. But I was of the view, if I can, I will, that's what I'm going to do. And I did and I had these two incredible children in very, very relaxed, very calm, almost comatose, it was so relaxed. And it was amazing. So that's definitely one for me doing that, and working on how you can work on your mind and your mindset to help you create the outcome that you really want to create. Because if you've got the vision — it has to start with some sort of vision of what it is you want, this is how it's going to be first — and then once you've got a vision, you've got some understanding of what that looks like. So I looked up loads and loads of research for that, for example, to understand what that looked like. I went on a course for it, I watched videos of women doing lots and lots of different versions of natural birthing and water birthing and all that kind of thing. So I just thought it's possible, I've seen people do it, it's possible to do it naturally. I've seen animals do it naturally. It's possible. So you get that thing in your brain that I can do this too. Why not? Why not me? So that was definitely a big one, the birth thing, the natural and water birthing twice was a really big one for me.

Maribel:

Wow, amazing. I have lots of questions. I've made so many notes of things that I want to go deeper into with you, Rebecca. So you mentioned the word ‘mindset’. And you mentioned the word ‘control’. And the word ‘outcome’. Is the mindset the thing that in all these different things, you mentioned career transition, living in different countries, childbirth, is the mindset the most important thing? Or are there other aspects that we need to work on in order to have control of the outcomes?

Rebecca:

It’s an interesting question. I think you have to have just this belief in yourself that you’re worthy of this thing. You know, why not me? Why can this not be me? Why does this have to be somebody else? And that's something that I hear in my coaching practice, I hear women say that to me: Success doesn't happen to me, it happens to other people, for example. I really don't believe in that concept. I believe if you believe that you're deserving of an outcome, then why not? All you have to do is just think about what the steps are. I start with that vision of what is it I actually want? How do I want the ultimate thing to be, like I want to have this beautiful birth or I want to have this life in this particular country. And then you work out the steps that are needed to make that thing happen. It's like just running a little project basically. And I think you have to be really curious too, about learning about that. You have to be curious about learning those steps, you have to be curious about what could go wrong, you have to be curious about what success looks like in the outcome. And do a project around it — I'm learning more and more about this thing and the more you learn the less scary it seems. I think that’s the reality. We let our fears overtake us when we don't have enough information in our hands and that fear becomes the knowledge rather than the knowledge becoming the knowledge. So you make your decision based on fear and not doing something rather than basing your decision based on the facts or the research that you've done by doing that kind of curiosity phase. That's how I look at it.

Maribel:

Oh, wow, that's really interesting. I particularly like the question that you ask yourself, why not me? So it sounds to me like to feel that you’re deserving of a particular outcome is what makes or breaks things happening to you and you getting on that journey to get to those outcomes. What if I don't feel deserving? How can you change that?

Rebecca:

Yeah, that's a really good question. It's a huge question. And the truth is, I've grown up in an environment where everything was possible. I grew up in Hong Kong, as I mentioned. Hong Kong is one of those really dynamic, well it was in the 80s when I was growing up there and the 90s, it’s one of those really dynamic environments where success was really celebrated. People were encouraged to do well academically, people were encouraged to do well financially, people were encouraged to put up a skyscraper if they wanted to. People pushed for success in their careers and they also pushed for success in their personal lives, it's kind of like the play-hard/work-hard concept. So I was surrounded by that growing up. And for me, I was extremely fortunate from that perspective, because our family could travel around Asia a lot, so I got a really good perspective of all different cultures and how people do things and how things happen and how cultures are so different. And I think it just makes you realise that this is obviously a First World economy, if that’s what you want to describe it as, where things can happen. And if you work really hard, you can make really good outcomes happen for yourself, it’s possible. There are people all around you doing it. And I think that environmental influence has a massive impact, just like having parents who are very, very encouraging, which is exactly what I had, that’s a means of building that sense of self-worth, like you were talking about, am I deserving of this? I had people jigging[?] me up, I had people saying, Rebecca, the world's your oyster, you can do whatever it is you want to do, you're a smart girl, all those sorts of things. And I'm very aware that a lot of people don't have that kind of encouragement when they're growing up, or those role models around them. But I suppose if that's you, the question is, if you want to make something happen that's different in your life, whatever that might be, then the first step is to say, I do deserve this, I am worthy of this thing, and start building up evidence to support that belief. So it's like, why am I worthy? Well, because what I'm saying is interesting, because I've got this background, because I've got this education, whatever that education might be, because I've got this passion in this area, whatever it is. So start looking at all the facets of what you actually do have, what you can offer, and start building the evidence as to why you are completely worthy for whatever it is you want to put your mind to.

Maribel:

Oh, wow, I like that approach that you're talking about, to build evidence and create something palpable, that you convince yourself that you're worthy. Because oftentimes, people who are lacking in self-worth, it's because they didn't learn it, they didn't get it from caretakers or the authority people in their lives, in their childhood neglected them, ergo, I'm not worth it. These people who I need to connect with don’t take care of me. So then you start doing it yourself as an adult, you start taking care of yourself or those little traumatised parts of yourself. It's really interesting. I would love to hear more about how that career transition that you mentioned, and that it happened on two levels, because you didn't only change the area, but you also changed from being an employee to having your own business. Can you tell us a little bit more about that?

Rebecca:

Absolutely! I could talk to you about that for three years, probably. Yeah, so I started off my career in advertising and I chased an interest in creating. Creativity is one of my biggest values and my biggest passions, and I’m quite creative in lots of different aspects of my life. It's just something that drives me, it's something I'm strong at. And I find it interesting because it's a never ending exploration, I think it connects back to curiosity. And I think I initially was really engaged in my work in advertising, but I realised that there wasn't enough, oddly, of the creativity that I was seeking. It's obviously a creative industry, but I was an account manager essentially, and I just wasn't getting the variety of opportunities that I really needed for me to feel happy, for me to feel creative, for me to be thriving. Because unless you were a creative, it felt like you couldn’t be creative, if that makes sense. And it wasn't an encouraged concept. And that drove me a bit nuts, to be honest. So I remember sitting many times on the same park bench at lunchtime, trying to work out what I wanted to do with myself, and I decided that I needed to focus on where I was strong. I needed to focus on where my passions were and where my energy really was. And I did a lot of my own personal development at the time anyway and I thought, I wonder if there’s a career in that? I wonder if there’s money to be made from actually helping other people develop. So I went on this journey of really understanding myself more deeply. I did a lot of training in life coaching and career coaching and organisational coaching, I then did NLP training. And the more I learned — it's that curiosity thing — the more I learned, the fear subsided, like I was describing before, and I got more and more excited about actually doing this full-time. So I decided initially to do it part-time with my work, and I did it in the evenings, and I built up some clients and started to get some experience, some feedback and all that sort of thing. And it was a really interesting journey in itself. And then when we moved to Sydney I said to my husband, I think the time has come where I've got to just launch this thing. I've just got to go for it and see what's gonna happen and if it doesn't work, I can always go back and get a job. And he was very supportive, as he’s always been throughout my entire career, and I just went for it. And you really underestimate just how full-on a shift that really is, from going from basically making something that's an interest area into a business, because you've learned the skills of coaching and you're really still at the beginning of that journey, this is 13 years ago now. And then you're also trying to launch a business. And they're all different aspects, because business is sales, it's marketing, it's cold-calling people, it's building up relationships with people, whilst also doing all the coaching as well. So I realised very early on that, when you start a new business, 90% of it is marketing. It's not coaching, it's not doing the business itself, it's building the business. And that took me a little while to work that out. I was like, This is so hard, why is it difficult? And as time’s gone on, I've obviously invested in my business and invested in my own training and understanding sales much more effectively, understanding how to build systems around my business, understanding automation, or just understanding marketing. There's lots of different kinds of marketing, now: social media marketing, and email marketing, and video marketing, there's so many different things to learn. But me being me, I find that really exciting, I find that really invigorating. But there's so much still to learn and it's a continuous learning curve. But how I see it is you go up the learning curve, you plateau for a bit where you feel safe and know what you're doing, and then there's another learning curve very quickly, and then you plateau again, and that's just the personal journey that you go on as you move through. And obviously as you get bigger, then you can hire people to help you with those business functions, so that you can focus more energies on the coaching and even hire people to do the coaching if you wanted to. So yeah, it's interesting, it's been a hugely invigorating, sometimes very scary journey. But constantly thinking about the endpoint, constantly thinking about what am I trying to do this for? What's the big purpose? And just enjoying it, it's an amazing experience doing what we do, isn't it, Maribel? Helping other people to become their true power, to become their true authentic selves, and to get the promotions and in my world, it's like getting promoted and having that presence, that executive presence that you really want to have, that's a life changing skill to learn. And that for me is massively, massively gratifying. And it's why I do what I do.

Maribel:

Amazing. Thanks for all that, Rebecca. And for someone who is thinking of leaving their corporate job and starting their own business, from your experience what is the most important mindset shift that you need? Because we're talking about two different things. It sounds like it's not too big, but I have the impression that they're very different. What do you think that is?

Rebecca:

The mindset to move from a corporate role to an entrepreneurial role?

Maribel:

Yes.

Rebecca:

There's probably a few things going on. I think the fundamental things, I think most people who move into a business from a corporate job are seeking some freedom. And they're seeking some flexibility in their work. And they're seeking something that they're more passionate about. It tends to be, I think, that they're looking for something to work in an area that they're really, really genuinely passionate about and they really want to make a difference with that passion area. The thing that I think is really interesting that I've very much learned is freedom is a bit of a red herring, because the irony is, is when you start your own business, and you’ll know this too, Maribel, is the freedom is not there, because you are working so hard in those startup phases, because it's just you in the business normally — it might not be, it might be a few of you — but it's a lot of work. So there's actually very little freedom in the early days because you're working so hard. I think the mindset that helps you move into that space is there's a possibility thing there, I suppose. This is a real chance for me to make my mark, this is a real chance for me to deliver the meaning and the outputs that I really want to deliver. And I think if you focus on that as an endpoint — it’s always the endpoint for me — if you focus on that endpoint, that's what drives you to make the decision. Making that kind of meaningful difference, whatever that means for you, because for everybody it’s completely different, is the driver, the focus, the mission, if you like, that pushes you to do that. So for me, the mindset thing is about focusing on the mission, the purpose of what that business will deliver.

Maribel:

Excellent. In all these stories that you've told me, I was particularly interested to hear that you were, Oh, I was going to say ‘lucky’, but you don't like that. I don't know if you were lucky.

Rebecca:

Fortunate, maybe. Fortunate’s better!

Maribel:

I was gonna say that growing up, you had that social support in your family, and maybe also in school, that supported you to have this self-worth. There are things in life that are outside of our control, they just happen, and you talked before about having a vision and working toward outcomes. But how do you deal with all the stuff that is just random and just happens and it could be that some of these things are not helping you to achieve that outcome that you're looking for?

Rebecca:

That is such a good question. Because you're right, there's so much that's out of your control, lots of things are out of your control. And I think the number one thing that I've learned is to be okay with that, because control is actually one of my big values. And I've learned that actually from having children, and when you realise that you have very little control, sometimes, over what's going on and that really pushes that button right? My control’s gone, aargh! But I think the reality is, I think as you get older and I think as you have more experience, whether it's from a personal perspective or professional experience, you have ups and downs in relationships where things are out of your control, that other person has some control, and you have some control. But I think the thing that I've learned is to be okay with the fact that you can't control everything, to almost see that as part of the journey, to see that as part of the learning experience. Because I genuinely think that when you have a knockback, which happens all day long running your own business, you have situations where you plan a product and it gets pulled or you have a pandemic and things change, you have to adapt. If you try and stay rigid to your own plan and you just say, okay, it’s this way or no other way, you're going to be constantly disappointed. So I think you've got to say to yourself, This is what I'm aiming for, this is the vision, this is what I really want. It doesn't have to happen in the next three months, if it happens in the next eight months, say with COVID or something, you have to adapt that expectation of what's okay. I've learned that also with parenting, you have to adapt your expectation of what you can achieve in a day as a working mom, you have to adapt your expectation of what your kids can do and achieve in any given time. And you as a family also, I think everything shifts. And I think you have to be a bit more flexible and a bit more open to the fact that something might not go to plan, something might go wrong. And that's okay, it's just part of the process, it's not a failure. It's just part of that learning journey. And I've had situations, I’ve had relationships, for example, that have extraordinarily disappointed me. And that's a very, very challenging thing to deal with because, like I say, there's only so much you can do in that situation because there’s two people in any relationship. And you're reliant on them meeting your expectations. But what I've learned with that is, when you do that, you're always setting yourself up to fail because you can't judge somebody else on your own values. You have to try and take a step back, you have to do that little bit of internal self-reflection, a bit of self-coaching. And you have to ask yourself questions like, what's this person valuing right now? What's important to them? Why are they behaving this way? What is it that's causing them to behave this way? And you might actually get some insight as to what's going on for them. And that might give you that opportunity to release the need to control the situation. You say, Actually, this is their thing, it’s what they're going through, this is some vulnerability, maybe that they're dealing with. I can’t control that, I'm not getting the outcome I want, but that's okay because, like I say, if you’re judging people on your own standard or on your own values all the time, you'll be disappointed because everyone's so different. Everyone has a different way of doing things, everyone behaves differently. And that's okay. That just has to be okay. I think you’re right, focus on what you can absolutely control, because there’s a lot which is absolutely in your control: who you decide to hang out with is in your control, who you decide to be in a relationship with is in your control, how they behave towards you is partly in your control — you can do things about that, right? But you have to just draw the line, I think, as to where that line is, where your control stops and their control starts. And being okay when the rain blows and the wind comes down and everything goes to pot and then regroup and ask yourself, Okay, what do I want? Am I still on track for this outcome? Is it still what I want, whether it's the relationship, or whether it's the career goal, or whether it's the business goal? And then check back, Okay, what have I got to deal with right now? What am I working with? How can I make this thing work within my control? And I think that's just constantly what you have to do, you have to constantly reassess what's going well, what's not going quite so well and what can I do about that.

Maribel:

Amazing, that's really good. As you mentioned the aspect of relationships, I was thinking that in our socialisation we are taught to value some relationships in a particular way, and see them as that kind of relationship is one that is a bond that you cannot break. But you talked about being disappointed from relationships. Is it okay, and if yes, how do we walk away from relationships that are not serving us or that are harming us? And at the same time we're thinking, Can I even do this? Is this allowed? What do you think?

Rebecca:

Look, I think it's a very open question. And I think there's 101 different relationships out there, 101 different relationship things that can go on, that can go well, that could not go well in that situation. I think the thing that I've learned from my experience of that is that you have to… there are different kinds of relationships too, because it could be a work relationship, where it's a transactional, rational relationship that you have with that person, like with a boss who might be toxic, for example, or it could be somebody in your family, your immediate family where obviously, that's a lot more of an emotional thing. And there are impacts if you end that relationship, or impacts if you keep blowing up at birthday parties or something like that, because it's more of an emotional challenge and problem. But whatever the relationship, whoever the relationship is with, I think it's really important to take a step back from what's going on and the minutia and the arguing or the detail of what this thing is about, taking a step back, removing yourself from that as a situation. And again, asking yourself, okay, what do I actually want? What do I want from this relationship? Do I even want this relationship? The biggest question you can ask. Do I want to be involved with this person, whoever this person is? If the answer is no, then it's up to you to take control and to say, this is not working for me, these are the reasons why, these are the behaviours I don't enjoy, etc. If you believe that there is a path for you to work through this thing, then you need to decide what behaviours are okay for you and what behaviours are not okay for you, and you need to communicate those boundaries to that person. Because I've seen it happen a few times in my life, with friends actually, where there's not been clarity of communication around expectations in relationships. And then the relationship has gone south. There's a breakup, but the other person doesn't really understand why that's happened. And it's because those expectations and those challenges and those problems around boundaries have never been communicated. So the person who's crossed the boundaries is unsure and unclear as to what they've done wrong, because they were never sure of the boundary in the first place. Now, obviously, some boundaries are very obvious to most people that you cannot do this, you cannot do that. But there are lots of nuances within boundaries, that if they're important to you, you must communicate them, “I hate it when you leave the toilet seat up”, for example. It's like a small little thing, but if it bugs you, say something about it, “I hate that you don't do any cooking in the week.” If that bugs you, say something about it. It's important that we have this constant communication about what we think’s okay and what is not okay because I think a lot of relationship breakdown happens because of miscommunication rather than anything else, certainly in the smaller behavioural problem things.

Maribel:

Amazing. Thanks so much for that.

Rebecca:

I am not really a Behaviour or a Relationship Specialist at all!

Maribel:

I think we're all experts in our own lives and that's what we're talking about. Now, I'd like to turn a little bit to what you do in terms of career coaching for women. Would you like to tell us a little bit more about that to our audience?

Rebecca:

I would love to, thank you. Essentially, in our business, we run a variety of different programmes, we've run a 12-month programme, we run 8-week programmes, all in the space of career strategy and career planning and personal branding and leadership. So it's very much about deciding the outcomes that you want from your career and building up that self-worth and that courage to go for those bigger opportunities, the ones that you’ve been saying, I can't do, I'm not ready for, I'm not good enough for, that's the kind of stuff that I want to challenge you to move forward, to push yourself towards. So it's very much about aligning yourself with opportunities that play to your strengths, that give you your best opportunities to shine, to stop doing the things that you just don't like doing, don't do very well, and focusing more on your strengths. And then the second piece is really building that executive presence, like I mentioned, around who do I want to be at work, how do I show up, how do I connect with people, influence people, how do I build visibility and credibility with key stakeholders so they know what I'm doing, so they recognise what I'm doing? One of the number one problems a lot of women have in my world, where we start working together is they say, Look, I'm just not recognised, I just feel invisible at work, I feel like my contribution isn't noticed, I feel like it's not meaningful. We have those kinds of conversations at first. So, understanding your value is a big, big piece of that and I think this is partly why women are often underpaid. It's definitely systemic as well. But I think there's a lot that we can learn and we can teach to help people really negotiate better deals for themselves, so that they're getting paid exactly what they’re worth. Our business is global, so we work with clients from all around the world. And it's a really beautiful industry to be in and I absolutely love what I do.

Maribel:

I totally agree with that. That's something that I admire and empowering women to change what's in their control, because, as you said, yes, there are systemic things, barriers that are institutional or governmental, but there's a lot that each woman can do to improve their situation. Amazing, thanks very much. So it's time for me to ask you our final question and that is related to the name of our podcast. ‘Audacious’ is the part that relates to having the audacity to do that audacious goal in the first place. And the word ‘ness’ describes a spit of land that juts out into the sea. So the question for you is, Rebecca, what in your life gives you the solid grounding to continue everything else that is in motion around you and to deal with everything that life is throwing at you?

Rebecca:

I think the number one thing is to see it as a journey and to see it as fun and to see it as a way of learning and growing in yourself and finding out what you're really capable of. I think that in itself is really, really fun. And I think setting yourself regular projects, around trying something new, doing something different, meeting different people, going to a different country. For me variety is important, for some people that's the worst thing ever. But I like that idea of seeking out new growth experiences all the time and just seeing what that does for you, because I think every single experience that you have, whatever it is, whether it's a relationship thing, a financial thing, a career thing, it all creates the person that you are right now. And the thing that's really exciting, I think, is the only real control that you have is in this moment right now. It is this person that you are right now with all of that stuff that you've experienced and learned. This is your moment, you can put that all together into this space and say, Okay, now, I’ve got all of that behind me, what can I do next with that? Who am I now? What can I do with that? And that's exciting for me because the world's your oyster, right? It’s a never-ending experience of just learning and growing.

Maribel:

Amazing. Thank you very much. Rebecca, it was a pleasure to have you here, to have this conversation with you. Thanks very much.

Rebecca:

Thank you so much.

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About the Podcast

AudaciousNess
A solid grounding on which to practice your audacity.
AudaciousNess showcases individuals who have set themselves bold, audacious goals and have worked to achieve them. Our purpose is to inspire people to act with the courage to create a positive impact in the world.

Through interviewing 'regular people' about their audacious goals, we highlight the fact that role models are everywhere. Each and every one of us can have an impact in some way. Our goal is to enable a courageous community that honours their genius and lives their calling.

The name 'AudaciousNess' has two components: audacious, meaning 'bold', and ness, meaning 'a strip of land projecting into a body of water'. We believe having a solid grounding on which to practice your audacity is crucial, or, in the words of the great philosopher king Marcus Aurelius (Meditations, 4.49):

"Be like the promontory against which the waves continually break, but it stands firm and tames the fury of the water around it."

About your hosts

Maribel Ortega

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I help women find their worth and be confident so that they can use their voice, speak up, take new opportunities and ultimately lead fulfilled lives.

Helen Strong

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I run an eco-friendly, vegan B&B in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. This is just one of the many audacious goals I've pursued in my lifetime.