Episode 29

Being a Fierce Life Warrior with Julie Trager

Published on: 27th April, 2022

Julie Trager is a writer, a channel and a spiritual mentor based in California. After 15 years working in hospice and palliative care which eventually led to burnout, Julie surrendered herself to God. She learned to stop trying to fit into societal norms and pressures, and now lives a magical and fierce life she finds “incredibly joyful and peaceful and interesting and fun.” In this interview, Julie talks about:

  • what it means to surrender to a higher power: to stop doing and start being
  • how everyday distractions hinder us from discovering who we really are 
  • trusting our intuition and understanding fully our connection with nature
  • how society causes us to tamp down our potential in order to “fit in”
  • the failings of modern medicine and the benefits of holistic healthcare 
  • what channelling is (and that any one of us can do it!)  

Julie can be contacted at fiercelifewarrior@icloud.com

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Music: Pablito's Way by Paolo Pavan

Transcript
Helen:

Hello, Julie, and thank you very much for agreeing to speak to us for our podcast AudaciousNess. I'm going to begin by asking you to tell us a little bit about yourself, but before I do that, I just want to mention that I absolutely love the way that you sign off your emails with Fierce Life Warrior and Soul Detective. And so, I'm wondering if you're going to mention something about that when you talk about the audacious things that you do. So can you just say a little bit about yourself, Julie, and some of the audacious things that you've done?

Julie:

Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be here. I am a channel, a writer and a spiritual mentor. But those aspects of myself have only come into my being in the last few years. Before that I lived a pretty traditional life. I had the nine to five job and I went to college and to grad school and I was married and had a house and all the things. And then I moved to California and my life completely fell apart. That old traditional life, I just couldn't get it back when I moved to California. And now I know it was all divine intervention and divine play, but at the time I was devastated. And I had no identity, I got so much my identity out of what I did for a living and here I was without a job and without purpose, it felt like. And I was just bereft, and I couldn't figure out what to do. And it wasn't until I surrendered completely, and I had always had a relationship with God and had been following spiritual teachers for years, but it was in that surrendering where I basically said, ‘Okay, God, I do not know what to do. I have no idea where to go. So I'm just gonna lay on the couch and read books for two weeks until you tell me what to do.’ And it ended up being about two weeks and I slept and I ate and I read and I walked and that was all I did. Until I realised, after watching a silly B-movie with an actor I kind of liked, that I wanted to be a writer. The movie was about a writer who quit writing and began writing again at the end of the movie. And as the credits are rolling, I'm sobbing and I realised I want to be a writer. And 10 days later, I got a book project over lunch with a friend. And that's how my fierce life warrior presentation began, that's how that entered my own life, because I realised that for so long I had been living in this narrow little box that society had prescribed for me. And I was miserable and I was burnt out. And this surrendering to God brought me this entirely different life and since then, I have been really dedicated to helping other people find those aspects of themselves that have been locked away in tiny little boxes and open them up to their own authenticity, their own intuition, their own sense of purpose and mission and to help them walk into that. And to me that's really what living life as a fierce life warrior is all about.

Helen:

Lovely. Thanks very much for that. Julie. Can I go back to the point where you were working in what you said was a regular job in your regular life before you moved to California? Can you briefly tell us what it is that you were doing and was there something that caused the change, that you moved to California before it then went horribly wrong? Or maybe horribly right? What was it that you were doing and was there a trigger?

Julie:

There definitely was a trigger. I had spent the last 15 years of my career in the medical field. And prior to me getting that job, I had what I would call my decade of loss. So, my mom died and then a year and a half later, my dad died and then two years later, my husband asked me for a divorce and told me he was having an affair and then two years after that my brother died under some mysterious circumstances. And so I was really rocked by all of those losses and then I entered the medical field shortly after and part of that was prompted by my parents’ deaths because I really wasn't talked to by the doctors in a way that really told me what was going on. I didn't know medical jargon at that point in time and that's all I got and it was really hard for me to put the pieces together and when my dad died I was completely shocked, even though now looking back I knew full well that the doctors knew he was dying. Nobody told me that he was dying and it would have been so much different had I known that. So I ended up in the medical field, in hospice and palliative care, because I really wanted to help other people understand what was happening to themselves, to their loved ones in a way that used regular everyday language that people can understand. But that was a really challenging career to go into. Most of the doctors at the hospital that I worked at didn't want me there. It was an uphill struggle every day to be accepted for what I did. Now, after a few years, that actually turned around and doctors did accept me and they realised, ‘Oh yeah, I don't have to have those icky conversations with patients and families, she'll do it.’ Then I was busier than I’d ever dreamed of, but then that brought a whole new set of stressors. And so by the end of that 15 years, I was and, truthfully, you know, I come from the United States perspective and healthcare in the United States is a pretty broken system. And I could see healthcare changing in ways that really disheartened me. And in the meantime, I also developed an autoimmune disorder. And I was told by my primary doctor that basically I was going to be on medication for the rest of my life and I just refused to accept that. I just refused to accept it and so I started doing all of my own research and I realised a) that I was really burned out from my current career, b) that all of my research around my autoimmune disorder led me to this whole world of medicine that I didn't even know existed. And I started really working with my own body to heal it through more natural means like diet and supplementation and meditation. And I just sort of realised I couldn't do this traditional healthcare thing anymore. And so I quit that job and became certified as a health coach and started a health coaching business but I realised in starting that business that I had been working with people one on one for decades as a social worker and a therapist and a palliative care expert and I was just really burnt out on working with people one on one. So the health coaching career, while it seemed like a good idea, just didn't really work for me anymore. And so that's when I said ‘Well, I’m probably gonna have to go get a regular nine to five job again’ to my husband at the time. ‘Do you want me to look in Chicago or do you want me to look in California?’ and my husband said ‘California!’ So that's what brought us here.

Maribel:

Oh, wow. I have made some notes and I have lots of questions, but I think I need to start just with one first. So let's work ourselves through my questions, Julie. First of all, I want to go back to what you mentioned of making that change after the decade of loss and you said, ‘I surrendered.’ That has for you a special meaning and I want to unpack that. If you could please share with us a little bit what that meant to you, or what that means to you, to surrender. And how do I surrender? If I feel like I'm on the verge of something similar happening, how do I do that?

Julie:

I really just stopped doing anything to try to make my situation better. I just stopped because I realised that everything I had been doing wasn't getting me anywhere. So ultimately, what surrendering meant for me was to stop doing and just start being. And in that being, which sounds silly, I was laying on my couch reading books and taking walks, but I was quiet. I didn't have distractions of looking for a job and going on interviews and driving to networking events. I was quiet. And I truly think that it was in that quietness that the intuition came to watch that movie. And in that quietness of watching that movie, I came to the realisation that I wanted to be a writer. It was when I got rid of all the distractions of life to the extent that I could, that I was able to find myself in the absence of those distractions.

Maribel:

So basically, the answers were in you.

Julie:

They were there all along.

Maribel:

And you just needed to mute everything else.

Julie:

Yes. And I think that's true for all of us. And I think it's often why so many of us are so unhappy because we live lives full of distractions. TV and alcohol and entertainment, so many methods of entertainment like movies and going out to dinner and video games and whatever it is that your particular distractions are. Social media for sure. Those distractions keep us, I think, from finding out who we really are deep down and what it is that we really want.

Maribel:

Yeah, that resonates so much with me. I think that we use these distractions to not feel, that we're afraid of feeling sad or angry or just realising, ‘I hate my life.’

Julie:

I so agree with that.

Maribel:

You know, that we just want to keep on doing what we learned, that's what we need to do. And just in order to not listen to that inner voice screaming at you, ‘You have to stop it!’ ‘No, no, no, let me go out, let me check on Facebook or whatever’ and not face that. I would like to understand a little bit more what you do. You mentioned three things that you do. You said you were a channel, for me big question mark. What is a channel? So please explain. Then you say you’re a writer — what kind of writing do you do? And you're a spiritual mentor — what does that mean?

Julie:

So I'll start with the easiest one first, which is writer. I really started writing through a ghostwriting project. So ghostwriting is simply writing a book for someone else. And I have written one book for a friend that was published a year ago and then I've written a second book with someone who reached out to me through that friend, and that book is waiting to be published. So, so far, my writing has mostly been working with other people in terms of their own content and getting that content out into the world. Now I'm working on my own book, and I'm pretty excited about that. And being a channel is interesting, because for people unfamiliar with the spiritual jargon, it's a bit challenging to describe what being a channel is all about, but I'll do my best. Really, to me, channelling is simply being open to access interdimensional, multi-dimensional information. So it's receiving messages from beings who are not on the earth plane. Most people, when they think of channelling think of mediumship, which is being able to receive messages from people who have recently passed on. And I think of channelling as an extension or a bigger umbrella of mediumship, in that channels, in the way that I think about channelling, receive messages and transmit messages from beings that are higher dimensional. So let’s say, archangels and angels and ascended masters and gurus. So for example, Divine Mother many people channel, Mary Magdalene, Master Jesus, Babaji from the Indian world. And so it is simply just being open to accessing that energy of those higher dimensional beings and being able to receive messages from them and transmit them out to the world.

Maribel:

Wow. Okay, that's a whole new vocabulary for me.

Julie:

For most people, I suspect.

Maribel:

But it sounds very interesting. So when you're working as a channel, do you work together with someone? Or is this connected with a particular person in our realm, that there is some kind of communication? I guess I'm just being biased by my knowledge of medium.

Julie:

So I call myself an open channel. A lot of channels channel one being or one collective. I think Jeremiah is a collective of beings that speak as one voice called Jeremiah and I can't remember the person who channels Jeremiah, but there are some famous channels, well-known channels who channel a very specific being or set of beings. I am able to channel a lot of different beings. So I channelled Isis, I channelled Master Jesus, I’ve channelled Divine Mother, I’ve channelled many different beings, including some beings known to us in our current age, for example, Thomas Jefferson, who was one of the architects of our Constitution, and John Lennon. So I'm just fortunate enough to be open to more energies than just a single being or collective.

Helen:

And then the third thing that you said you do, Julie, is spiritual mentoring. Is that connected with the channelling?

Julie:

It is, simply because channelling helps me connect and offer, I think, a higher wisdom than I could certainly offer from my own brain and my own experience. But being a spiritual mentor is really connected to being a fierce life warrior myself and understanding that my life has changed so much since I really embraced my own warrior self. And all I mean by fierce life warrior is exactly what you mean by audaciousness. It's this idea that I don't let societal norms and pressures tell me who I am or how to show up in the world. And that's a big deal because most of us, and I did for a long time, showed up exactly how the world wanted me to show up. And now, while my life is hard to explain sometimes to other people, I cannot tell you how incredibly joyful and peaceful and interesting and fun my life is, not to say that I don't have challenges because I certainly do, but because I understand how magical living an audacious life can be, a fierce life. I'm a warrior for helping other people do that same thing to step into their own way of living a fierce life.

Maribel:

Well you certainly look like you have the energy of a teenager, that's what I get from listening and looking at you. How difficult was for you, making that change, leaving that marriage, leaving the house, leaving the box?

Julie:

So I remember listening to one of your guests, Claire Tonna I think was her name. What a beautiful bright soul she is. And I remember her talking about her dark night of the soul and I think when most of us say dark night of the soul, what we really mean, or call it what it is, is that we really honestly don't think we want to be here anymore. We’re wondering, is this worth it? And I think most people who are deeply committed to living a spiritual life that is theirs and theirs alone, that is a life led by intuition rather than those societal pressures and norms, I can't lie, but oftentimes there is this point where it feels so hard. And Claire said another thing that I just love, she talked about shaving layers of your life off. And it's so true because so much of that distracted, showing up in the way others want you to show up, life that many of us live, that has to drop away before you can truly live in your intuition, in the present moment to live that audacious, authentic life. A lot of that old stuff, a lot of the old ways that you think of yourself, and the way that you show up and the way that you present to the world and what you do in the world oftentimes has to drop away. Now, it isn't always that traumatic, I don't think, but for many of us who are pretty committed to a spiritual path, there are points where it is that dramatic. It is worth every single moment of that dark night of the soul, I will tell everyone it is worth all of it. But until you're on the other side of that, it can feel pretty dark.

Helen:

You mentioned before, Julie, that it can be quite tricky or difficult for you to explain to other people what it is exactly that you do. You're obviously in exactly the right place that you're meant to be right now, but not everybody is going to understand or appreciate that. How do you deal with those people?

Julie:

I have come to understand that we are each and every one of us on our very own path. Part of what channelling has done for me is it has helped me love myself. Higher dimensional beings are always so filled with unconditional love that when I started channelling on a daily basis, and I started connecting with these higher dimensional beings, they simply not only showered me with unconditional love, but they helped me to see that all of the aspects of myself that I had tried to bury or tamp down or eliminate because I didn't like some of some parts of myself, and we always focus on the negative aspects of ourselves instead of the parts of ourselves that we actually like, right? But my guides, these higher dimensional beings, have helped me to see that even those aspects of myself that I didn't like very much were helpful. They were carrying me forward rather than holding me back. And once I started to love myself in that way and to see myself in that way, I could start to see everybody else in that way too. And then it's so much easier to show up as my audacious, authentic self and to let everybody else do what they're going do and to be on the path that they're on. And honour wherever it is that they’re at.

Helen:

That's lovely. That's a lovely response. Sorry, Maribel, you wanted to come in there.

Maribel:

Yes. I wanted to ask about the bit of loving yourself because there are tons of books about it and that’s the basis of self-esteem, love yourself, blah blah, blah. How do you really do that? Because we all have our, let's just call it small trauma from your childhood, from growing up, from people that put you down, that criticised you in a time of your life that you were, as a child, vulnerable. And then those beliefs are so ingrained in your mind that it's really hard to change them. How can I really practice loving myself?

Julie:

Honestly, I couldn't have done it on my own and I couldn't have done it with a book and even speaking as someone who is a trained therapist and had a private practice for a long time, even therapy I don't think can really get you all the way there, to be honest. I think that having a relationship with your guides, your intuition, your God, whatever your God looks like, I honestly think that's the only way to move through that. Now, I will say that I found resources like hypnosis, for example, that were able to take me back into those traumatic times I had been to as a child, some past life traumas, if a past life is something that you resonate with. And I was able to release and rewire some of those old memories. And I think actually that's a form of channelling, honestly, it's a way of channelling through that self-love that is God, that unconditional love that is God, and bringing it through and helping to rewire your brain. But for me, it has been my relationship with my guides through channelling and through just sitting in meditation and getting quiet that has actually shown me how those parts of myself that were wounded and not so seemingly helpful, are something else altogether. It's why I'm passionate about teaching other people how to channel, because we all have the capacity to channel. Oftentimes people think that the ability to channel is super special.

Helen:

Maribel’s looking shocked, here!

Julie:

I know, but to a single person, everyone I’ve taught how to channel has already been channelling in some way or another. I’m not special, trust me. I’m really not. The only thing different about me is that I dared to try, I believed that I could and I trusted what came through. That's it. That's the only thing that makes me any different than anyone else.

Maribel:

Well, I want to try that!

Julie:

It’s actually not that complicated.

Maribel:

Really? Well, I know nothing about this topic so it’s difficult to try to imagine how it works. Is that somehow connected to your work as a spiritual mentor?

Julie:

Definitely. I think the knowledge and wisdom that I bring to others as a mentor is not my own oftentimes. When I'm working with other people as a mentor, my brain gets out of the way and the wisdom that comes through me I don't really think of as my own. I'm just an open channel for those people that I work with and what tends to happen is their guides come through me. It looks like a perfectly normal average conversation in a lot of ways, but when I create that space in a mentoring session, I don't think it's a normal conversation at all because there's often a lot more going on. And the way I know that is I will say things oftentimes in a mentoring session and in my brain, I'm thinking, ‘Oh wow, where did that come from?’ And if you've ever said something to someone and thought, ‘Oh wow, where did that come from?’ you were channelling.

Maribel:

Oh, it happens all the time! I say something and think, ‘Damn! That was really good!’

Helen:

You see, there you go, Maribel. Julie, I wanted to ask about role models. Obviously, you've got your connection with God and with higher beings. So, coming back down to the human realm, I want to ask whether there are any human role models that have helped you and guided you in your past or right now, that you can say something about those.

Julie:

In the past there were so many including, and I hate to belabour the idea of channelling, but honestly, mediums and channels were oftentimes my role models and two of my most important spiritual teachers over the last 20 years have been channels who have channelled higher dimensional beings and brought that wisdom into their spiritual teachings. So Veronica Torres, who’s a channel for a collective of beings called Elohim. She meets three times a month and all of her stuff is online. And Michaela Sheldon, who is an open channel like me, had a huge influence on me, mainly because I realised that I had been living in this masculinized world for a long time and I started to really understand that even in my spiritual teaching, I was really surrounded by the masculine and I was craving some feminine softness and energy and so when I found Michaela Sheldon, she brought this divine feminine energy to my awareness, my conscious awareness, and that forever changed me. It just helped me see more deeply into my intuition and to trust what I was receiving and to bring it forth in a way that was much softer and gentler. And there were so many authors. The first author that was a role model and who really started me to channelling, was an author that was popular back in the day, I want to say the late 80s, early 90s, and his name was Neale Donald Walsch, and he wrote a series of books called Conversations with God. Anybody remember those books?

Helen:

I haven’t read them but I think I’ve heard of them.

Julie:

Most people have heard of them. He was big in the States, I don't know how big he was in Europe or in other areas of the world, but really, that's what he was doing, he was writing questions to God on a piece of paper, and then he was writing the answers that he received. And that's a form of channelling called automatic writing. And I read those books and I thought, ‘Well, if he can do that, I can do that too.’ And sure enough, I did. But it wasn't until I had put those journals aside and because I was distracted from my job and real life, I stopped doing that. I did it for a decade and then I just stopped. And I cleaned out my garage not that long ago, a few years ago, and I found all of those journals and I started to read those answers that I was getting to the questions that I was writing to God in my journal and I thought, Holy cow, there's something way bigger and going on here, because that those answers are not coming from me.’ And that's really when I started to go back and rediscover that ability. So I have to say he was a huge spiritual mentor in that he got me to understand that I could have a direct connection with God.

Helen:

The reason that I asked the question about human role models is because we spoke to a former Buddhist monk a few months ago, and he said, and we titled the episode ‘Our Best Role Model is Nature’, because he actually questioned whether humans are good role models at all because you can learn everything you want from nature. I'm wondering if it's the same type of thing that he meant, from the spirit, from the universe, from God, from what I guess, was possibly the same as what he was saying about nature. So that started me asking myself the question, do we actually need human role models, with all our imperfections, when there's a perfect role model out there, or in us? How would you answer that question, because you've mentioned some actual human role models. What do you think of that chain of thought?

Julie:

I'm so so glad that you asked that question because I absolutely 100% agree with you. It was hard for me to answer the question about human role models, honestly, because in the past, yes, I had some but I’ve really come to understand that I don't need anything outside of myself. I don't need role models. And as humans, we're all such imperfect creatures. And higher dimensional beings will also tell you they're not perfect either. But we all have exactly what we need to move forward on our path without any outside influences. In fact, it's my understanding now that when you truly truly sink into your intuition and live your life from that place, make your decisions more from your intuition than from your brain, really sink into your own knowing about everything, you don’t need anything else outside of you. And I agree that what nature does is remind you that you are connected to everything. And nature is such a perfect reflection of what God is, in my way of thinking, that God is simply life doing its thing, based on its own sense of what it's here to do. Bees and hawks and trees and flowers and grass, they all just do what they're meant to do naturally, because it's hardwired into them, that connection, that just utter connection, interconnection, let's say, with everything else. And there's so little efforting involved with nature. It just does what it's meant to do. And I honestly think that as humans, if we started to live more like that, we'd be much happier creatures. And the world would be more peaceful, quite frankly.

Maribel:

I was thinking as I was listening to you, everything gets broken when we try to “educate” kids, when we try to create out of them a mould, ‘You should do this. You shouldn’t do that. This is okay. And this is not okay.’ And then during those first, let's say 18-20 years of people's lives, we take out the intuition, I’m not sure how to put it, we just put them in some kind of box, whatever box that we think they should go. What do you think? Do you think that if we didn't parent children that much, or educate children, that they would do as flowers or bees or a river, a tree?

Julie:

Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. So much of how we form children, or help children form themselves, is really to help them to grow up to be members of society. It's what our educational system developed around, was this idea that we have to create good workers who can fit into the society that works for money, and then provides for themselves and their families. And so in order to live in an ordered society, and I don't mean to seem like I’m a proponent of chaos, I'm not, but so much of what we teach children is how to live in this well-ordered society. But in order to do that, you have to tamp down a great deal of yourself, and I think kids, when they're born, are so much closer to God than they are even 10 years later, because we have, and I am not blaming parents or teachers or anyone, this is just how we evolved as humans to live in this society that we live in and no one’s to blame, but I agree with you that we lose that connection to God, that open connection to God, to our guides, to our intuition, to our own sense of self, the longer we live, that earthly life that we're born into. We do train it out of people, I think.

Maribel:

Julie, I'm interested in something that is not what you're doing right now, but that you did, what you mentioned about working in hospice and palliative medicine, particularly because in my other life, when I was in my 20s, I studied five years of medicine. So when doctors talk to me, I understand most of it because I know the jargon and I also know that people don't understand. And because I understand not everything but a lot, I feel like I have the guts to say, ‘What does that mean? Can you explain that to me?’ And because I understand maybe a little bit more so I'm not worried about, ‘I don't know what that is. Explain that to me. What does that mean?’ So I ask a lot of questions and I could also be maybe a little brat with them because it irritates me and I really hate it when they come from this perspective of ‘I went to med school for 10 years, and I'm this enlightened, better being and I'm going to explain it to you in a way that you don't understand what I'm talking about.’ How important do you feel that that work was, in order for people to come to terms, especially when they are, let's say, leaving this, I don't know what to call it, this world or this way of life and moving on to something else? What do you think was the impact in them passing on, what was the impact of your work in making that transition easier and lighter?

Julie:

I think it was huge. And the way that I know that, is the feedback that I got from the people that I talked to. Death and dying has a way of ripping away the bullshit and getting to the heart of who people are and what people need and want and people's fears and other strong emotions, the love that people have for each other, the conflicting emotions that people have for each other, the conflicting emotions that people have around death and dying. And it was an enormous relief to many people that I talked to, just to get it out into the open that either death was occurring or death might be occurring. And every person that I talked to who was dying, meaning they had hours, days, maybe a week left, they all knew they were dying. Every single one knew they were dying, and so often it was a relief to get that out into the open, and for families to understand because we all know intuitively when someone is leaving their body. We just know it. But for doctors to continue to act like everything is okay, there is this huge disconnect and people don't know what to do with that. So yeah, I think mainly it was just a relief to talk openly about what was really happening. On the flip side of that I've come to learn, to look back at my career in palliative medicine and think, oftentimes I would give a prognosis, ‘How much time?’ is a question I always got, from families especially, but often from patients too, ‘How much time do I have?’ or ‘How much time do we have left with our dad?’ And I would tell them based on my experience, my research, what I saw going on physically with the person who was dying. And it's so easy to give a prognosis or a diagnosis, but I no longer think, now that I've explored this world of alternative and energy medicine, I no longer think that those kinds of labels, those kinds of pronouncements about what is going to happen is very useful. So I loved what I did, and I do think that I brought a great deal of comfort to patients and families, and yet, I look at the way medicine is organised, what we call healthcare, which isn't really healthcare to begin with, it’s disease management, it’s not healthcare. But I look at how healthcare is organised and I think we have put labels and people and diseases and things that go wrong with the body into these narrow little boxes and then we created these narrow treatments around that and we make these pronouncements about what is or is not going to happen and I no longer think any of that truly is of service.

Maribel:

So medicine is also in boxes, like our society and our behaviour?

Julie:

Almost more so than anything else I've come across, honestly.

Helen:

Julie, this has been a fascinating interview, but unfortunately, we're coming to the end, so I'm going to ask you our final question. I suspect I already know the answer to it, but I'm going to ask it anyway. It's to do with the name of our podcast, which as you know is AudaciousNess. And the audacious part relates to you having the audacity to do the thing that you do in the first place. The word ‘ness’ is an archaic term which describes a spit of land jutting out into the sea and remaining strong, no matter what the elements are throwing at it. So for us, audaciousness means having the solid grounding to keep going, no matter what is happening around you. So our final question to you is, what is it that gives you the solid grounding to keep going? How do you stay grounded in your mission and in what you're doing, despite everything that life is throwing at you?

Julie:

I have learned to connect deeply to my intuition, to that centre of myself, that quiet centre of myself that is truly truly who I am, that part of myself that is connected to everything, to God, to everything and I keep grounded by continuing to go back to that place and to make decisions and to move forward in my life based on what that place, that intuitive part of me, that connected part of me tells me to do, rather than what the outside world tells me to do.

Helen:

That’s lovely. Thank you so much, Julie.

Maribel:

Beautiful. Thank you for this amazing conversation.

Julie:

I love you both. Thank you.

Helen:

We love you too, Julie!

Maribel:

Thank you. Bye bye.

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About the Podcast

AudaciousNess
A solid grounding on which to practice your audacity.
AudaciousNess showcases individuals who have set themselves bold, audacious goals and have worked to achieve them. Our purpose is to inspire people to act with the courage to create a positive impact in the world.

Through interviewing 'regular people' about their audacious goals, we highlight the fact that role models are everywhere. Each and every one of us can have an impact in some way. Our goal is to enable a courageous community that honours their genius and lives their calling.

The name 'AudaciousNess' has two components: audacious, meaning 'bold', and ness, meaning 'a strip of land projecting into a body of water'. We believe having a solid grounding on which to practice your audacity is crucial, or, in the words of the great philosopher king Marcus Aurelius (Meditations, 4.49):

"Be like the promontory against which the waves continually break, but it stands firm and tames the fury of the water around it."

About your hosts

Maribel Ortega

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I help women find their worth and be confident so that they can use their voice, speak up, take new opportunities and ultimately lead fulfilled lives.

Helen Strong

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I run an eco-friendly, vegan B&B in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. This is just one of the many audacious goals I've pursued in my lifetime.