Episode 33

Alleviating World Poverty with Timmy Douglas

Published on: 22nd June, 2022

Timmy Douglas is a podcaster, coach and entrepreneur from Austin, Texas. Still only in his early twenties, Timmy has set himself the audacious goals of firstly, securing financial freedom for himself and his family, and secondly, alleviating world poverty. In this interview, Timmy talks about:

  • what financial freedom is and how it can be achieved
  • how he plans to set up a system to alleviate world poverty
  • his passion and drive for helping people achieve their dreams and goals
  • why it’s important to lead an authentic life and take care of yourself
  • having a moral obligation to achieve our wishes

Timmy can be contacted via his website: workwithtimmydouglas.com

The books mentioned in this episode are The Compound Effect by Darren Hardy and Who Not How by Dan Sullivan and Benjamin Hardy

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Music: Pablito's Way by Paolo Pavan

Transcript
Maribel:

Welcome to another episode of the AudaciousNess podcast. Today we have Timothy Douglas with us, whom I met online as he interviewed me, but I won't say anything more and I’ll let Timmy introduce himself. Timmy, tell us what it is that you do and what is the audacious work that you are onto?

Timmy:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Thanks for having me on the show. So, as you said, Timmy Douglas and I am the host of the Living the Dream podcast. With that podcast, I have one big goal and that’s to create a community of people that helps each other take massive action, inspire them to dream bigger, hold them accountable to dreaming bigger and then celebrate progress together. So that's the goal of the community. That was more of a passion project. The audacious work that I say I focus on… I really have two goals in my life: that's creating financial freedom for myself and my family, and then spending the rest of my life alleviating poverty around the world. And that goes in extreme poverty and relative poverty, because there are people in poverty in the United States where it may not be extreme, but relative to wealth in the US, they are still on a poverty scale. And so that's what I want to spend the rest of my life doing.

Maribel:

Wow, that sounds pretty audacious. Do you do this, because I have the feeling, do you do this full time?

Timmy:

No, I don't do it full time yet.

Maribel:

Exactly. So that means you have a nine to five job?

Timmy:

I have a sales job. Flexible schedule, so I can sprinkle some stuff throughout the day. But I have a sales job, I do the podcast and I am working my way towards financial freedom. And that's when I'll jump into it full time.

Maribel:

Exactly. Well, that was the point of my question, making it obvious to our listeners that it's not that you're just doing this all the time, it’s like, after your nine to five job then you do all this audacious work. And you're a coach, aren't you?

Timmy:

Yep, yep. So the coaching has actually changed up a little bit. I do it one on one with people when the opportunity presents itself, but I'm more moving towards a group model, which is a creative dealmakers mastermind. The goal is to bring people in who are younger entrepreneurs and have them focus on doing real estate deals, doing business deals or partnering with people to get their startup side hustles off the ground. So it doesn't have to be a traditional tech startup, it can be a coaching practice, it can be an affiliate marketing gig, but getting stuff off the ground to get revenue in their pockets because I've really been trying to hone in on who I want to help and how I want to bring value to them. And there's been a lot of, okay, who was I three years ago and what did I need? And this is what I came on. I was in the entrepreneurial game three years ago, which, when I was in college I was a sophomore three years ago. And the problem was I was doing it alone. And I was failing because I wasn't a) getting mentors, b) around people who could hold me accountable and who were dreaming bigger. And so I'm creating that community for younger entrepreneurs and college students who want to generate 4-5k a month by the time they get out of college, through their business. That's the goal for them. Whether they all succeed, obviously that's up to the work that we all put in. But that's the goal — to give them some guidance to do that through real estate business or some side hustle.

Maribel:

Wow, I'm just impressed. That I'm just calculating three years ago, you were a sophomore. That means you're in your early 20s, right? And I'm just imagining myself when I was in my early 20s. We are like universes apart because I was really like, “Entrepreneurship? What?” So that's really amazing. That's precisely one of the things that impressed me the most about you when we first had our conversation. Can you tell me a little bit more where this desire to help people who are in poverty comes from and how you are aiming to do that?

Timmy:

Yeah, absolutely. So, growing up my family was, I would say, lower middle class income but we had six kids in the house so we experienced a lot of lack. We would want stuff and we couldn't have it. Our house was a mess. My parents were always stressed. They were always arguing about money. There was no order. And so we just experienced a lot of struggle. And I was like, I see other people's lives who aren't like this or seemingly so, based on how they come to school. Obviously you don't know everybody's home life, but I was like, there has to be something better out there, so what are we doing wrong? And so I was always looking for that and when I was 14 the only apparent problem I could see was that we lacked income. If we had more income, a lot of these issues would be solved, like we could hire somebody to clean the house, there would be no need for arguments about money. And that was as far as my brain could go at 14. So I was like, I'm gonna get financial freedom for myself and my family. And that was my goal, starting at 14. And then I got older and I got to 18 and I went to college and my mind expanded. I saw the world outside of my own little selfish window. And I started seeing homeless people. And I was like, “Well, if I was struggling so much, and my life was so stressful as a kid in a house where we had shelter, food and water, but it was still really stressful, how much more stressed is this person who doesn't have a home? Who doesn't know where the next meal is gonna come from? Who doesn't have water?” And even more than that, I started to learn about wealth creation and how there are people who have made millions of dollars who went to zero and then made millions of dollars again in a couple of years. I was like, There's something for the money game that I'm not quite getting. And so I started learning about it and as I learned about it, I started to feel morally obligated to fight for people who are in poverty, because if I took better action, if I had been more consistent, if I had been more disciplined, yeah, I can't change people (although if you go to my podcast and hear the questions I ask, I still try to ask whether or not that's possible), but I'm pretty well aware that I can't change people. But I do believe we can set up an environment that facilitates change. And part of that takes money. Part of that takes time. Part of that takes energy. Part of that takes community. But if you have the money, you can pull the resources and so I feel morally obligated to get the finances, to get partners who had the financing and have the same heart to help those people because if I was in pain, how much pain are they in? And nobody should be in that much pain.

Helen:

Thank you Timmy. I wonder if we could go back, so you've mentioned financial freedom a couple of times, I wonder if we could go back to a definition of that. How would you define financial freedom? And also why is it important in your opinion?

Timmy:

Absolutely. Absolutely. So financial freedom, in my opinion, is when my passive income exceeds, and this is a personal opinion, exceeds my monthly living expenses and has a decent chunk of money to take care of my family. And that's because some people in my family, obviously growing up how we grew up, probably didn't get along how I got along and aren't on the financial grind, aren't on the financial freedom creation, and so I would like to have… it doesn't have to be completely passive, I could own a business where I have to work five hours a week. And in my head that's passive enough. Because getting something completely passive where you don't have to manage it, don't have to look at a portfolio, that's pretty difficult. So in my head, if I have to manage a business or five hours a week or call asset managers for my real estate every week or every two weeks, that's fine by me, but as long as it's not taking up most of my day, it's a flexible call, it's a flexible check in. That’s where I'm fine with and so that's what passive income is to me, something where I'm generating enough income to cover my expenses and to have money to help out my family. And so, I'd say good monthly expenses for me is like, I want 15,000 USD a month for me and my family, that's for my immediate family. And then to help my extended family I would say, another 15-30. And so if I had about 45 to 60 coming in a month from businesses and real estate that I own, that's the point where I'm, “Okay, I've hit the mark. Now I can shift focus completely from growing to really going At Left with Love”, which is the nonprofit that I'll be alleviating poverty under. So that's the target I'm trying to hit.

Helen:

Okay, to my ears that seems like quite a lot of money that you're aiming for, but obviously you're wanting to do good with that in terms of alleviating poverty, your second goal there. I'm just wondering, is it necessary to have that extent of money? I mean, you said initially the definition of financial freedom is that your income is more than your expenses, but then if your expenses are lower, then obviously your income needs to be lower. So you've said these figures, I'm just wondering, this is possibly impractical for lots of people to aim for. So what would you say what is something that the average person could aim for?

Timmy:

Yeah, yeah, no, for sure. Honestly, my goal coming out of college I was, I only want 3000 a month because I can live off 3000 a month easy. I can live off less than that. So I really think it's as low as you can take your expenses, take them and then get your passive income to right above that level and then you can go be free from basically any obligations. As long as your debts are cleared and you can cover your monthly expenses, you're good to do literally whatever you want. And so, go do it. And I would say it's a very personal number for everybody. I really want to be able to help my family without looking at the bill. And I think that will be about enough money to do so. If it’s not, there's another issue we need to talk about. And so that's where I'm at. I think it's a very personal number for everybody. And some people would laugh at my 60,000. Like, “I can't even eat dinner five times with 60,000.” I think they have a spending… I don't want to call it a spending problem, but they have a preference to spend more money than I do. But still, I think it's important to really just identify your goals, identify what will work for you and then get a game plan for getting there, because I'm probably gonna have to take on a bit more risk than the average individual wants to take on to get to my goal in the time I want to get to my goal in. But it's also because I want to spend the rest of my life alleviating poverty. If somebody didn't have that goal of spending all my time alleviating poverty, they like their job, they get put on a 20 year time horizon, they could buy one real estate rental per year and probably get there in the next 20 years. And so it depends on your goals, depends on your dreams and if you like your job or not, and you want to stay in it.

Helen:

Yeah, I understand. And I think you've said something already, that everybody is different. Everybody has different goals in terms of financial goals, personal goals and so on. And you also mentioned about people can change and that you're trying to get people to change in the coaching business that you're doing. I'm curious about this, as to whether some of us are simply born with financial acumen and others aren't and can't learn that. And so I'm wondering if you could say something about that, are some of us just destined to be broke forever because we just don't know how to manage our finances? We've never been taught it in school or from our parents or whatever.

Timmy:

Yeah, for sure. I would have said, 300, 400, 500 years ago, I would have said, Yeah, probably. But I think now, like 2022 I don't think anybody's destined to be broke. I think some people are born broke, and it's gonna be really, really hard for you to get money because you're gonna have to break through some limiting beliefs. You're gonna have to break through some community barriers. Like if you're broke, the people you're around are probably broke, which means you guys are just bouncing broke ideas off each other. Because nobody's really thinking on a wealthy level. And so until you get around different people, until you take in different information, yeah, you're gonna be broke. And so it is easy to say, I'm destined to be broke, because nothing is working in my favour. But you just really have to go out of your way to make things work in your favour, and then you're destined to be wealthy. And so you really just have to go get the information, because it's possible for you to do it. I don't think anybody is incapable of being wealthy. I think some people will have a really, really difficult time trying to get there, a) because we're all stubborn, and we all don't like change, but b) that information is really hard to get access to if you don't know where to look, and you don't have anybody around you that knows where to look. And that's when you have to be in an endless search. And there are some people who are gonna be in an endless search, and they're gonna come across this podcast, and they're gonna call one of us three and then we're gonna give them the right book or introduce them to the right person, and then their lives change for the rest of their life. And so I wouldn't say anybody’s destined to be broke, unless they have… like my brother has Down syndrome. Even if we put the information in front of him, he probably wouldn't know how to utilise it because he's 18/19 and doesn’t know how to read. And so, him on his own, I would see a hard time him accruing by pursuing information. But, outside of cases like that, I think if you can read and you can write, you can get the information. So people who never learned to read, never learned to write, which, unfortunately, is a large amount of the population, it might be a little harder for them. But if you can think, honestly, if you can listen, I think you can find that information, but it's gonna be really hard.

Helen:

And one more question on this point, then. Do you think that you need to be able to create wealth and manage your financial situation in order to be able to do audacious goals? Or do you think people can do audacious things without that understanding?

Timmy:

Absolutely you can do audacious things without that understanding. I think it helps. But money is, and some people get this, some people don't, but money is kind of imaginary. If you think about how people gather money, especially when you look at how billionaires use money, they have a business that's worth this and nobody really knows why it's worth that, it’s because X amount of people have bought into it, and they take out loans on their business and spend that money to start another business. It's weird how money works at that level. But when you think about it, money comes because of service. When value is added, money can exchange hands, it's just a common means of exchange. And so if you can impact people and you can get their attention and you can rally them to do something like you're a good leader, you can do audacious things without money. And you see that with… I don't think Gandhi used a lot of marketing budget to impact the lives that he did, but he did it and that's because he just stepped out into it. And I honestly think, which is something I've been struggling with, like I have two goals, financial freedom for myself and my family and then alleviating poverty around the world. Well, with what I just said, my goals conflict each other. Do you really need financial freedom before you go alleviate poverty? I think the honest answer is no. But I think for me, personally, I'm really stressed when I don't have money so I can't operate at that stress level. And so I'm choosing not to. Some people can operate at that stress level because they genuinely don't need the money. I think for most of us, that's probably not how it's going to work out. But I do think it's possible.

Maribel:

I just want to say I think your brother is very lucky to have this big brother. And I kept thinking about this expression that you said, that broke people are mingling or connecting with other broke people and they're bouncing broke ideas, I thought that was really cool, or well, funny. How can you, or anyone, get out of this vicious cycle? Helen and I were talking the other day, or something that I mentioned, that you are the average of the five or six people you come in contact with most of the time. So if you're surrounded by people who have a certain type of attitude towards life or towards creating wealth, how can you change that?

Timmy:

Yeah, that's a good question. I think there are five things that make up a person: you have your beliefs and your thoughts come from your beliefs and then your feelings come from your thoughts and then actions come after that which leads to results. I think if you change any of those five things, and you commit to the change, the people around you will start to not want to be around you as much. For example, if me and my broke friends always go to the bar and spend $100 on alcohol on Friday, and I say I'm done drinking, now we can't really hang out on Friday night if they still want to go to the bar. Then you have to find out, Well, who am I going to hang out with on Friday night? Well, who doesn't drink on Friday night? What are they doing? I think that's when you can start to get around other people. So you can either just change from the get go, I think you'll start to find people who do the actions that you're starting to do, which if you took in the right information from a book, and you start to do the habits of a wealthy person, you will find other people who have those habits. I think that's the first way. I think that is by far the most complicated way because it's almost impossible to change on your own. I'm not saying it's impossible, it's just almost impossible and you are a better person than I if you can do it. So I think the other way is to get really uncomfortable for 15 to 30 seconds and try to relate to people who you know are where you want to be on a human level. So you're gonna be, I don't have anything in common with them, they have more money than me, they have a car, they have more put together kids, they have a more put together family, they have a more put together, blah, blah, blah, they probably have a lot of things that are better than you. But what we all have in common is that we are all human and we all want love and we all want to be loved. And I think we can always meet each other right there. And so something that comes up a lot on my podcast is adding value to people who have all the money in the world. Yeah, you may not be able to bring them another business deal because they have a whole pipeline of that, but what you can do is really do something special for their child. And that might bring tears to their eyes, and if you could do something special for their child and connect with them on an emotional level, now you've built a relationship that, once you're around them, you'll be around their friends, that'll automatically change your habits and then it'll level up every area of your life. So I think it's really getting uncomfortable for 15 to 30 seconds and connecting with them on an emotional level, whatever that means. There are a lot of ways to connect with people on an emotional level. But I think it's putting yourself out there, getting uncomfortable and connecting with somebody who is where you want to be. And just being humble. They have the right to say no, go try and connect with somebody else. But identify, I think Russell Brunson has a Dream 100. And it's not quite the correct concept to use here, but you could list out your Dream 100 of people that you want in your friend group. Friend groups are typically smaller, so maybe you make a Dream 15. And then just start contacting those people and reaching out to them and I think that's a great way to do it. Just go connect with them, because you are human, they are human, we have a very human baseline in common, which is love and emotion, and I think we can all connect there if we're willing to get vulnerable enough.

Maribel:

Helen, what did I tell you? This guy is awesome. So, are you saying, Timmy, that I should think of people that I admire and that are a couple of steps ahead to where I want to be and then just reach out and try to connect with them?

Timmy:

Yeah, yeah. That's a great way to do it. People who are a couple steps ahead, people who are a step ahead. And then I think also people who are also reaching out to those people, because they're also trying to get where you're going and that's also… there's a piece of it where I feel like shared suffering builds bonds. And so, if you guys are both getting rejected trying to do the same thing, but you both have this really big vision of the world, really big vision of your life, I think that can build some really cool bonds where you can go from where you are now to the top basically with these people who you really care about. So, people who are a couple of steps ahead of you. You don't have to never be around people who are your broke friends or whatever, because that might be our family for some of us. But Darren Hardy puts it in a really good way. In The Compound Effect, he says there are five minute people and then there are three hour people. I can spend five minutes with this person but after five minutes, it starts to become bad for me. I need to leave that person. And for some people, they're 30-second people, and that's okay. In 30 seconds, say “How are you doing?” Tell them you love them, and then leave. But I think it's really important to find those 6-12 hour people who are at your same level and have your same vision. Because it's cool to build with people. It really is. But you have to make sure they're not taking away from the vision. But that most important aspect is that mentor because your mentor can also look at your life and be like, “Hey, these are probably not the best for you”, and they can introduce you to other people. So I think that one step, two step, a couple of steps ahead of you is probably the best first person to look for.

Helen:

Timmy, you said your second goal was to alleviate world poverty. That seems like a hugely audacious goal. I'm just wondering if you could let us in on some of your plans or your ideas of how you're gonna go about that.

Timmy:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. I thought a lot about it in college because I had the moment where I was like, “I don't really need money to start ending poverty. I'm just gonna go after it.” And then I got hungry. And I was hungry again. I was like, “Oh, man, this isn't gonna work because I'm hungry in college, where a lot of my stuff is paid for, when I hit the real world. It's gonna be rough.” So I switched gears a little bit. But I was writing a blog in college about my ideas for it. And basically, I'm pretty confident that right now all my ideas are extremely flawed, because I probably don't have a great understanding of poverty around the world. But the overarching plan is to get one billion people on board to act towards ending poverty in some way, shape, or form every day. And I figure if we have one billion people acting towards it every day, I don't need all the ideas. I don't need all the money. I don't need all the time. I don't need all the energy because when I look at my life, I don't see myself travelling from country to country and city to city, alleviating poverty. I see myself coming up with a system that can be implemented by the people in that city because they're probably the people who care about the people of that city the most. I like Austin. I like Charlotte. Those are places where I've been. I like Davidson, North Carolina. Those are places where I've been, but as for Seattle. I've never laid eyes on Seattle. I don't know the people in Seattle. I don't have any connections to Seattle. So it'd probably be best for the people of Seattle to really solve the local poverty problems there. And so that's really what I want — a system that can be implemented and then to get one billion people on board. And as for reaching the one billion people, there's this great book called Who not How and it is by Dr. Benjamin Sullivan, I think, either Dr. Benjamin Sullivan or Benjamin Hardy. It's by Dr. Benjamin Hardy and Dan Sullivan, that's why I was mixing up the names. And basically, it's instead of you trying to do everything by yourself and procrastinating on it, get a partner, find somebody who loves to do that and implement it with them. And so it'd be using a lot of Who not How for a lot of the issues and creating the system and implementing the system and rallying the one billion people. So, who has access to one billion people? That was a question I was asking myself in college. And I didn't know for the longest time and here's the thing about asking questions continuously — the answer will pop up at the most random times for no reason. I don't even know why this answer popped up. I think I was listening to a podcast or maybe a TV show or something like that. But Facebook has 2.7 billion monthly users. What? You’re telling me Facebook already has access to the one billion people? And that's half of their active user database. And some of those might be bots, etcetera, etcetera, multiple accounts. But regardless, once I started thinking about it, I was like, so we need one billion people, somebody already has access to the one billion people. And then I thought money was an issue but money really wasn't an issue. There was trillions of dollars, literally trillions of dollars paid out in stock dividends across the world. There's trillions of dollars in home equity, just in the United States, where it's just like untouched home equity. Granted, this is people's wealth, that they've been building and so it's hard to get people to part with their wealth, but it's 0.01% of that, 0.1% of that. Could we get people to give that? So I don't think money is the issue, I really think it's time, energy and relationships. Because I think people are really selfish when it comes to their time and their energy. And a lot of times when people need help… like you could give me right now a million dollars, and I might be able to do something with it, but I’d probably make a lot of mistakes. And so I wouldn't be able to turn that million into 10 million, like maybe a Grant Cardone would. He knows how to invest in real estate, exactly what a system is, he'd be able to turn that million into 10 million. So when you find people who are really in poverty, more than money, they need that time, energy and relationships from people who are willing to walk the distance with them. Because you could give a broke person a million dollars and most broke people would literally lose the million dollars. That's just financial intelligence and what they lack and what they’ve learned. And so that's all a system, but what we all need: time, energy, relationships, love. That's the stuff that transforms us. That's the stuff that makes life worth living. So I think that's the real problem when it comes to alleviating poverty, which is why I’m like, one billion people walking towards it every day, because if we could simply bounce somebody who's homeless, give them seven core families who are pouring into their life and checking up on them every day and coming to visit them every day, I really think it would change some lives. On both ends, honestly. for the homeless person, and then for the families who are just living their life. And so that's the idea.

Helen:

And do you have a time plan for this?

Timmy:

I don't have a time plan. I used to say just in the next 50 years. I want it to happen before I'm dead. But really, I think it could happen a lot sooner than that. I’m fast tracking towards financial freedom. I want that to be done in the next couple of years, which is why I'm probably going to have to take on a bit more risk than a lot of people. So I don't really advise that part of it. But as for the system for alleviating poverty, ideally, that'd be done by the time I'm 35, and then we'd be able to scale that system for the next 30-50 years until I'm gone. But I just want the system created and at that point, I want to partner with people to scale it. I really don't want to be heavily involved in that because I plan on having a decent chunk of kids, and I want to be there to raise my kids. So, that was the first goal of financial freedom, before I got on the anti-poverty thing. It was so I could be there for my kids. And so that part's not gonna go away.

Maribel:

This is so nice to hear you speaking about that, Timmy. What inspired you? Where's this coming from? Did you have a mentor or a role model? Can you talk a little bit about that?

Timmy:

Yeah, yeah. So I've actually wondered this a lot myself. And I know the moment where I started believing I could do it. It was when I was playing football in High School, 14, I was a freshman. I got moved up to the varsity and we were about to go through offseason, which was pretty difficult at my school, or at least that's how it was branded. And the coach looked at all the freshmen who were about to start offseason with the varsity. It was a really scary thing. Everybody was nervous. And he said, “Look at the person next to you when it gets hard during this next couple of months. Look at the person next to you. If they're doing it, you can do it too.” And I just took that and ran with it, mostly because I needed to get through the offseason and so I wasn't going to allow myself to fail. Mostly because I was competing with my brother, who had gotten to 11th grade varsity. I was like, I'm gonna go all four years or whatever. So yeah, I was competing with my brother. So I took what my coach said to heart, and that's how I got me through football. But then I started extrapolating it outside of football. And then I was like, “Well look at the person next to me. If they're doing it I can do it too.” And I have extrapolated the person next to me to anybody on the planet Earth or who has ever lived, which may not be right next to me, but if a human can do it, I can do it too. And I just like to hold that mindset. There was a barrier I ran into when it came to alleviating poverty, because obviously there's still poverty so poverty has not been alleviated. But it's not that poverty hasn't been alleviated, it's that poverty hasn't been alleviated at scale. Many people have ended poverty for themselves and many people have ended poverty for one other person or two other people or five other people. So now all I have to do is scale it. And it's probably been scaled on a minor scale, and I just have to scale it on a little bit of a wider scale. So in my head, it's like something that's been done and I just have to innovate a little bit. It's like tweaking the wheel, as opposed to creating the concept of the wheel. And so that was an encouraging thought for me, because for a little bit there, I was doubting my ability. Am I just talking and it's not actually able to be done? But no, I think it can legitimately be done, hey, because it has, it just needs to be done at scale now, which just requires a lot of people doing what one person did. And I think that's a pretty cool thought. But I would say it's back when I was 14, my coach telling me that, and then me applying it and getting positive feedback throughout my life.

Maribel:

Beautiful. And can you tell us a little bit about your podcast and what you are aiming with that and what you've learned through it? I remember when we had our conversation you said “Oh, at the beginning I was interviewing something crazy, every day”, and then you realised, “I can't keep this up. I need to slow down.” So what's the purpose of it and what have you learned along the way?

Timmy:

Yeah, absolutely. So the purpose of my podcast, it's kind of twofold. I really, really love helping people with their dreams and goals. It is just literally what I love to do. I see my spot in the alleviating poverty world as one on one to small group coaching, helping people figure out, What are your passions? What are your dreams? And let's go after them.” Yeah, we need to solve the money thing, but in 2022 especially, there are many ways to solve that online and with your passion and with your dreams. And so it's a lot of motivating people to be authentic to themselves and earn while doing it because we all have stuff we need to take care of, but that's where I see my part in the alleviating poverty. So the podcast is simply an extension of myself. It's what I love to do. I would do it for free for the rest of my life. And I will do it for free for the rest of my life, whether the podcast starts paying me or not. I will always talk to people about their dreams and goals and get them to do it because, I've talked a little bit about me playing football on this podcast. I hated football. I really hated it. I never liked playing it, even though I went to college for it, I ended up quitting when I got to college because football was another person's life for me. I wasn't confident enough in myself, I didn’t trust myself enough to live my own life. I still struggle with it to this day. I wake up, I go build another dude’s business, partly because I don't trust myself, partly because there are limitations. But it's twofold, especially as you get into success literature, you're fully experiencing what you're experiencing because of past actions, past beliefs, and current actions and current beliefs. For example, if I knew how to wake up and generate $100,000 in one day, as some people do, it requires a system, it requires time built, I get it, but if I knew how to do it, I probably wouldn't be working a job that pays me 60,000 a year. And so there's that trusting in myself and trusting in the knowledge I have and that level of confidence that I gotta look at every day and be practical with it. Don't go crazy with it. But take the honest look at yourself and take extreme ownership over where you're at. And so… I'm really losing my train of thought. Could you repeat the question for me?

Maribel:

I wanted to hear what you've learned by doing the podcast.

Timmy:

Yes. I learned that you really need to take time for yourself in two ways. So the podcast for me — extension on myself. I hated my life. I hated football. This is why I love helping people with their dreams and goals because I lived somebody else's life for so long. When I finally started to live my life, it was really fun for me and the podcast was the first step towards that. So now, I love to help people with their dreams and goals because I know that pain, I don't want people to experience that pain and continue living other people's lives. So that's what the podcast is really for — giving people a platform to fight for their dreams and goals and then I want to know who I need to connect them with, so they can take the next step towards their dreams and goals. That's the whole idea of the podcast. Then I create a community of people who hear that that person wants to be connected to this type of person or this specific person. They make the connection. They change that person's life. That's the vision. That's the long term goal. I'm doing that for myself. It gives me energy. I wanted to do something that excited me every day. That's where I was going with that last train of thought. The second part where I show up for myself is I started recording daily. I'm still committed to recording daily. However, I was recording 15 to 18 podcasts a week, interviews, because I had that many slots open. I could fill the slots on Matchmaker and Podmatch. And that was a lot. And I learned that even when something gives you energy… it's like drinking water. Drinking water is healthy for you but if you drink 360 ounces of water in a day, you're probably not going to be feeling too good. So drink the right amount of water. So that's what I had to learn with the podcast. It gives me energy. It's a good thing that gives me energy, but record the right number of podcasts. So now I'm down to recording six a week and I'm getting a little bit behind on my schedule because I got sick, I had some travelling and so I'm gonna have to ramp up the individual podcast because I'm not going to go back to ramping up my interviews, but I've created another section of the podcast where I talk about what I'm learning and what I'm doing. So I'll have to record a bit more of those but it's like 1-2, 5-10 minute episodes, as opposed to two to three more 30 minute to an hour long episodes. And so it's just learning to take care of yourself but also go after what you want. And be honest about it in every moment. At first I wanted a daily podcast, but then I was, “Do I want this daily podcast if it kills me? Well, no. So let me tone it down a little bit. You can still post daily but get smarter about your recording schedule.” And yeah, show up for yourself, do what gives you energy because there's more to… so the financial freedom part is one part of success. I would also say monitoring your energy levels, your health levels, the health of your relationships, that's where wealth really is. You have people who are dead broke and a lot happier than I am and that's because they figured out those other parts of life. And that's another thing I learned, there's just a little nugget about financial freedom — just because you're financially free does not mean you're free. So make sure you don't forget about that.

Helen:

Taking care of yourself and monitoring your own energy levels — I think that leads us nicely into our last question, Maribel.

Maribel:

Let’s do that. So, Timmy, our podcast is called AudaciousNess. The audacious part relates to having the audacity to come up with a big goal like yours in the first place and the ‘ness’ part describes a spit of land that juts out into the sea. So audaciousness means having a solid grounding where you practice your audacity and go for your goals. Now, our question to you is, while you are pursuing your goal, where do you get the solid grounding to continue while everything else is in motion? How do you stay grounded in your vision?

Timmy:

Yeah, this one is extremely hard. It is extremely difficult to do. And I would say the only way I can see it actually being done is by feeling some sort of moral obligation to your dream or goal. And I'm extremely connected to my goal of financial freedom because it impacts my family. If my family was fine, I probably wouldn't care that much about money. I'd probably be living a pretty normal chilled life where I’d put 200-300 in an index fund every month and just wait for my wealth. But I want to take on a bit more risk a bit earlier in life to accelerate the process so I can also spend time alleviating poverty, which goes to moral obligation number two. I have a moral obligation to my family and then a moral obligation to people who I feel are in pain, because, not that I'm the only person who can help them but I am a person who can help them. So if I'm a person who can help them and I can change somebody's life, for me not to do it, it's similar in my head to looking at somebody hanging on a cliff, having the ability to like pick them up and then letting them fall or letting them hang there. And so I think that moral obligation for me is really the only thing that can keep me going because the amount of negativity a) that a lot of us are hardwired to put on ourselves, that's the first thing. You got a lot of negativity coming from you. The second thing is a lot of negativity you get from the people around you, especially when you're trying to break free. There's a metaphor I always hear successful people talk about is when crabs are all in a bucket, if one crab tries to crawl out of the bucket, the other crabs will grab that crab and pull them back down into the bucket. I think that's what a lot of people do when other people try to level up their life. When your broke friend is trying to level up their life, it puts your insecurities and puts your limitations or your perceived limitations right in front of you. And so I think the key is feeling some sort of moral obligation to it, even if it's like a moral obligation to yourself, of “I'm going to be the best person I can be so I can impact people in the best way I know how.” I think that's good enough to have a moral obligation to your dreams and to your goals, and keeping that moral obligation in front of you. For example, I'm in Austin, Texas. Every time I see a homeless person in a tent, driving, literally three to five minutes away from my house, that's a reminder to get my butt in gear. And so, I think that's the most important thing: having a moral obligation and then taking in information continuously, consistently, that reminds you that you can do it. Because you can take in two types of information. You can take in a bunch of negative information that limits you and it’ll bog you down, like it wasn't possible anyway. Or you can take in a bunch of positive information that says the sky's the limit and then trust that. Because honestly, they could both be lies, right? It's not that it wasn't completely impossible, it may not be completely possible either, but if both could be lies, let's believe the one that makes us feel the best. Why not dream crazy?

Maribel:

I like that. I agree with you, dreaming crazy can be good. Thank you so much for being with us, Timmy, and for sharing all your ideas and your wisdom and part of your life story.

Timmy:

Of course, of course. I was happy to come on. Thank you guys for letting me share.

Helen:

Thank you, Timmy. And good luck with everything.

Timmy:

I appreciate. It.

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About the Podcast

AudaciousNess
A solid grounding on which to practice your audacity.
AudaciousNess showcases individuals who have set themselves bold, audacious goals and have worked to achieve them. Our purpose is to inspire people to act with the courage to create a positive impact in the world.

Through interviewing 'regular people' about their audacious goals, we highlight the fact that role models are everywhere. Each and every one of us can have an impact in some way. Our goal is to enable a courageous community that honours their genius and lives their calling.

The name 'AudaciousNess' has two components: audacious, meaning 'bold', and ness, meaning 'a strip of land projecting into a body of water'. We believe having a solid grounding on which to practice your audacity is crucial, or, in the words of the great philosopher king Marcus Aurelius (Meditations, 4.49):

"Be like the promontory against which the waves continually break, but it stands firm and tames the fury of the water around it."

About your hosts

Maribel Ortega

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I help women find their worth and be confident so that they can use their voice, speak up, take new opportunities and ultimately lead fulfilled lives.

Helen Strong

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I run an eco-friendly, vegan B&B in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. This is just one of the many audacious goals I've pursued in my lifetime.